Transparency in Fashion

by jessicaashxo

To be honest this has been something within the fashion industry that I’ve always thought about, not to mention the age old argument of quality over quantity. I’m talking about the quality of products, fabric and where items are made. The lack of detail released by fashion brands about

The people who actually make our clothes and the methods used in production have long been a bone of contention for ethical campaigners. But as fashion’s environmental and humanitarian impact comes under increased scrutiny – both in the press and within the trade itself – some labels are adopting a refreshingly open approach to transparency.

For example “Rapanui” is one such organisation. The young company has been attracting attention with its ‘traceability’ map – a tool that gives shoppers an interactive way to see the story behind their clothes. By typing a garment code into the “Rapanui” website, customers can follow the trail of that item on a map, from seed to shop. It offers information on the fabric used, the working conditions in the field, the ethical credentials of the factory involved, manufacturing and transportation. The full working map went live in April last year, and provides traceability for every stage of the production process for every single product “Rapanui” sells – something the founders believe is a world first.

But of course after giving this example, I visited the website to see for myself. Yes this is a genius way to understand and truly grasp the concept of where from and what you are putting on your body and feeling confident you are not supporting any such establishment as a sweatshop.

However and going back to the topic, this site is successful and popular with their consumers because they are open and honest as to where they consume their products all the way down to the entire process. Not to mention the ethical credentials of each stage of the process are verified through the use of certifications such as the Global Organic Textiles Standards and organisations such as the Far Wear Foundation.

It’s funny we purchase clothes for a bunch a different reasons, but have you ever stopped to think where the product was made and what you are actually placing on your skin, or what challenges came in order for you to wear……..

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